Sunday, March 12, 2017

So now you are cursed from the earth

[Cross-posted at Hitcoffee: please view that link for any updates.]

Dr. X, a friend of Hitcoffee, has warned against what some mental health professionals call the Dark Triad. This triad is, to quote Dr. X, a "personality organization that comprises three psychological traits: psychopathy, narcissism and Machiavellianism." People with that personality organization are dangerous. They are a problem that needs to be dealt with, especially if they are a coworker or in a position of responsibility.

What do we do with such people? In the comment thread to that post, Dr. X suggests that we fire them. To me, the obligation to fire implies that we shouldn't hire in the first place. If the dark triadic person is not independently wealthy and yet can't or shouldn't be hired, how should he or she fend for themselves? Perhaps once properly identified--either through that person's actions or through some sort of deep analysis--then we ought to consider civil commitment, or prison if justified. Or you can do the Philip K. Dick option: hunt down the androids and eliminate them. I reject that "solution" as does Dr. X and most (all?) others I"ve heard speak on it. But the terms of the discussion are consistent with certain conclusions.

Absent in the discussion on that thread and in the material Dr. X cites (or at least in the quoted portions of that material...I didn't read the linked-to articles), is a discussion of whether this personality organization is just how or what someone is, or if it has a (personal) history. If people develop into that organization or develop out of it. Not to call this an illness--it's not clear to me that the language of "personality organization" is a language about there a cure? Or are people just like that?

I'm obviously uncomfortable with the idea. Maybe it's naivete or wishful thinking. If such people exist, then they exist whether I like it or not. If almost by definition such people don't seek to change or improve or grow, then they don't. Sometimes survival and defense of the common good are important. My wish that such people who would imperil either don't exist doesn't mean that they don't.

These discussions remind me of the "mark of Cain" from Genesis. I thought it would be cool to incorporate an allusion to that story when talking about such people. But then I actually read the story, probably for the first time since I was a child. The story starts out as I remember. Cain kills Abel out of jealousy or envy or whatever. The Lord punishes him: "When you till the ground, it shall no longer yield its strength to you. A fugitive and a vagabond you shall be on the earth"

But it doesn't end there. Cain complains that it "will happen that anyone who finds me will kill me." To that the Lord commands that "whoever kills Cain, vengeance shall be taken on him sevenfold." And he sets a "mark" on Cain to warn people not to harm him.

I'm no expert in Biblical interpretations, and I imagine that that passage has been interpreted and reinterpreted through the ages. There's also a point of unclarity. The referent "him" on whom vengeance is to be meted sevenfold strikes me as amphibolous, at least in the version I'm quoting: I assume the vengeance is to be meted against the one who would harm Cain, but perhaps Cain is the recipient of the vengeance?
Still, the "mark" of Cain seems on my uninformed reading to be the opposite of what I had thought. It strikes me as a mark of mercy, or perhaps mercy tempered by a warning. People are not expressly forbidden to be wary of him or to stop him from further crimes, but they are forbidden to harm him.

Again, there may be other ways to interpret that story, and one might legitimately question whether that story ought to be a guide to anything. But that story exists and I can't shake it, just like I can't shake the possibility that dark triadic persons exist.

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